• Sharon Wilfong

Want to Write Compelling Content? Think Like a Storyteller

Updated: Sep 22

Your Brand and the Hero's Journey

"When we position our customer as the hero and ourselves as the guide, we will be recognized as a trusted resource to help them overcome their challenges." ― Donald Miller, Building a StoryBrand

Donald Miller's Building a Story Brand strategy uses many of the same principles as screenwriting to make content more engaging. It's a way to capture your audience's imagination and take them on a buyer's journey, where they become the hero. The concept matches that of a story arc in some of your favorite movies.

Even better? Story Brand content strategy works just as well when you're writing content for blog posts and web pages as it does when you're writing a script for a YouTube video.

Key Takeaways


Miller says that you can grab your audience's attention by first asking yourself these three questions:

  1. What does the hero (your customer) want?

  2. Who or what is the opposing force that keeps them from getting what they want?

  3. What's at stake?

But just like any fiction writer, you need to know your characters. You need to know who the hero is in this story.

Clarify Who Is Your Ideal Customer (The Hero in the Story)

Before you can understand what your customer wants, you need to know who they are and what drives their decisions. For example, do they want to save money? Or maybe it's time they need most. Do they want to build influence in their industry? Maybe they're looking for ways to connect with others.


What are the five wants your brand can fulfill?


Now narrow your focus to taking care of one at a time. Keep it simple. If you clarify your message around a single want, you invite the audience into the story. And, you don't confuse them about what it is you offer that will help them complete their mission.


Once you know who your customer is and what they want, it's time to think about your story's villain. This antagonist tries to keep the hero from getting what they want.

Consider Your Hero's Internal and External Challenges


The antagonist can be internal or external conflict. Who or what is keeping your audience from getting what they want? Once you understand the villain in the story, it's essential to position your brand as the way for your customer to rise up and take the necessary action to overcome those challenges.

A survey conducted by SEMrush found that 77% of the businesses that responded said they have a content marketing strategy. However, 39% rated it as average, and only 9% considered their business's content marketing strategy above average.


The problem is that most companies aren't aligning content and strategy in a way that positions the audience as the hero in the story. Instead, they may be providing too much information. Or worse yet, they could be making the story all about them.


If you take anything away from this post, remember that marketing is about providing value for the customer. Sales copy is about selling your products and services. That's why Miller's Building a Story Brand works.


The audience gets value from the content you offer, and in return, you get loyal customers who trust your recommendations.

Story Brand is also an example of how great writing can help you improve your marketing strategy. For more writing tips and marketing strategies, please subscribe to the IndiGirl Blog for inbox updates. Or, is it time to hire a content writer?

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